Major League Baseball makes first offer that includes full prorated salaries

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Players are angry following five years of flat salaries, a lost grievance claiming the Chicago Cubs manipulated the service time of star third baseman Kris Bryant in violation of the labor contract and allegations several teams did not properly use revenue sharing proceeds, which the union called "tanking". Major League Baseball and the MLBPA still have to agree on a plan on how they're going to play games.

The more games played, the more players make. The commissioner finally offered to pay the players their full prorated salaries, something they had decline to offer until now.

This past Wednesday MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred met with union executive director (MLBPA) Tony Clarke, hoping to find a compromise.

The owners' proposals have been on a steady decline - from 82 games to 76, to 72 just four days ago, and now 60 - while the players started at 114, and their last proposal, made a week ago, was 89. "It is unequivocally false to suggest that any tentative agreement or other agreement was reached in that meeting".

"We left that meeting with a jointly developed framework that we agreed could form the basis of an agreement and subject to conversations with our respective constituents", MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred said.

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As of Tuesday, the Athletic had reported at least eight owners might prefer not to play at all this season - and because 75% of the 30 owners must vote in favor of a proposal to approve it, eight votes would kill it.

In their March agreement, the sides vowed to "work in good faith to as soon as is practicable commence, play, and complete the fullest 2020 championship season and post-season that is economically feasible, consistent with" a series of provisions.

To be clear: no deal has been yet reached, and the Players Association would still prefer a regular season longer than the 60 games that is on the table - the better to reclaim as much of their original pay as possible. I summarized that framework numerous times in the meeting and sent Tony a written summary today. So, along side season length, health and safety measures are surely at the front of the minds of owners and players.

Manfred stated at the beginning of the week that he was no longer 100% confident there would be professional baseball in the U.S. this year, backtracking on last week's assertion that there was a 100% chance of players hitting the field for games.

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